Where we stand

Humans share around 90% of their genes with all other mammals, because of this animal research has been used to discover how the basic processes of the bodywork and how these can go wrong when the body is affected by disease. This knowledge is vital if we are to develop treatments for illnesses affecting humans or animals. Animals also benefit from this research, through the development of veterinary medicines and procedures.

Dogs

Treatment for rickets

Rabbits

Corneal transplants

Rabbits & Dogs

Local anaesthetics

Guinea Pigs

Discovery of vitamin C Blood transfusions

1900s

Dogs, Rabbits & Mice

Insulin

Dogs

Corneal distemper vaccine

Rats, Rabbits, Dogs, Cats & Monkeys

Modern anaesthetics

Horses & Guinea Pigs

Tetanus vaccine

Guinea Pigs, Rabbits, Horses & Monkeys

Diphtheria vaccine

Guinea Pigs, Rabbits, Mice & Dogs

Anticoagulants

1920s

Mice

Penicillin & Streptomycin

Monkeys

Discovery of rhesus factor

Guinea Pigs, Rabbits, Dogs & Monkeys

Kidney dialysis

Mice & Rabbits

Whooping cough vaccine

Dogs

Heart-lung machine for open heart surgery

1940s

Mice & Monkeys

Polio vaccine

Dogs, Sheep & Goats

Hip replacement surgery

Dogs

Kidney transplants

Dogs

Cardiac pacemakers

Rats, Mice & Dogs

Medicines for high blood pressure

Dogs, Calves, Rabbits, Guinea Pigs & Rats

Replacement heart valves

Rats, Rabbits & Monkeys

Chlorpromazine & other psychiatric medicines

1950s

Dogs

Heart transplants

Dogs

Coronary bypass operations

Monkeys

German measles vaccine

Monkeys

MMR Vaccine

Rats, Guines Pigs & Rabbits

Antidepressants & antipsychotics

1960s

Pigs

CT scanning for improved diagnosis

Mice

Chemotherapy for leukaemia

Rats & Dogs

Medicines to treat ulcers

Guinea Pigs & Rabbits

Inhaled asthma medication

1970s

Rabbits & Pigs

MRI scanning for improved diagnosis

Sheep, Rabbits & Cattle

Prenatal corticosteroids improving survival of premature babies

Rodents & Cattle

Treatment for Onchocerciasis

Monkeys

Life support systems for premature babies

Mice, Rabbits, Dogs & Monkeys

Medicines to control transplant rejection

Monkeys

Hepatitis B vaccines

Many Species

Medicines to treat viral diseases

Armadillos & Monkeys

Treatment for Leprosy

1980s

Mice & Monkeys

Combined therapy for HIV infection

Mice

Meningitis vaccines

Rats

Better medicines for depression

Mice, Rats & Dogs

Medicines for breast & prostate cancer

Mice

Medicines for type 2 diabetes

Guinea Pigs & Monkeys

New medication for Asthma

Rabbits

Statins to lower cholesterol

1990s

Monkeys

Deep brain stimulation for Parkinson Disease

Mice

Monoclonal antibodies for adult leukaemia

Rabbits & Cattle

Cervical cancer vaccine

Goats

Clotting agent form milk

Chickens & Ferrets

Bird flu vaccine

2000s

The creation of penicillin, blood transfusions, organ transplants and the administration of insulin to combat Diabetes have all come from research involving animals. There have been huge breakthroughs in the treatment for many illnesses thanks to animal research – Asthma, HIV, Meningitis, Cancer and Parkinson’s to name a few.

Every human around the world has benefitted from animal research in one way or another, even down to taking something as simple as paracetamol for pain relief – just one of the many drugs that have been developed with the help of research.

Facts on animal research

 

1

All research involving animals in the United Kingdom is licensed by the Home Office

2

Less than 10 per cent of biomedical research uses animals.

3

The testing of cosmetic products and their ingredients on animals has been illegal in the UK since 1998 and across the EU since 2013.

4

116 UK organisations have signed the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research. We are all committed to educating and helping the UK public understand more about animal research.

1

All research involving animals in the United Kingdom is licensed by the Home Office

2

Less than 10 per cent of biomedical research uses animals.

3

The testing of cosmetic products and their ingredients on animals has been illegal in the UK since 1998 and across the EU since 2013.

4

116 UK organisations have signed the Concordat on Openness on Animal Research. We are all committed to educating and helping the UK public understand more about animal research.

Image

Animals used in scientific research

Fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, are protected under UK law, because of this, licences are needed to carry out research on these animals. Genetically modified animals (mostly mice) now make up over half of the animals used in research. Larger animals such as pigs, dogs and monkeys, account for less than 2% of the animals used in research.

Our Position on research

Agenda Life Sciences supports the research community through the provision of services aimed at facilitating research. We believe that whilst animal research continues to make a valuable contribution to scientific understanding and the development of medical treatments, the animals should be treated with dignity and respect at all times.

Agenda Life Sciences fully supports the Reduction, Refinement and Replacement of the use of animals in research. Until viable alternatives to animals are available for all areas of research, the animals should be cared for by dedicated, professional and well-trained individuals who care passionately about animal care and welfare.

Animal welfare is a priority, but so also is the welfare of the dedicated people working with the animals and also the welfare of the life science sector itself. Our ‘Welfare First’ programme is designed to consistently deliver standards of animal care and welfare that exceeds regulatory requirements. It puts in place the building blocks that underpin effective care and welfare; it is Agenda’s assertion that caring for the people that care for the animals in turn supports and nurtures a culture of care within the life science sector.